Archive for Daily Nebraskan

Honor should be given all year

Posted in Culture, Patriotic with tags , , , , , , , , on February 13, 2013 by rylanreed

I couldn’t find this online, so I thought it would be good to just put it down here.

Monday, November 12, 2012 — DailyNebraskan.com

Our View — Take time to honor nation’s veterans this week

War is an ugly thing, and if we lived in a perfect world there would be no such thing as a veteran soldier.  But as it is, conflicts arise and soldiers respond. Risking their lives for the benefit of our great nation, veterans deserve our thanks at the very least.  As you are aware, Sunday was Veterans Day. We hope you did your part in thanking a veteran, whether a family member or friend, and showed your appreciation for the sacrifice done in part by our soldiers.
However, it goes without saying that we shouldn’t be thankful on a few select days throughout the year. Soldiers don’t protect our nation for only a few days – its a lifelong commitment.  Even after they have served our nation in times of conflict, the effects of war are lasting, and the results are often taken for granted.
We are living in a free nation today because of the brave men and women who have fought and served in our military throughout history, as we as those who continue to fight for our freedom today. Many have sacrificed their life protecting a freedom they held dear to their heart just so we could live it, and others endure nightmares and post-war anxiety so we can be safe at home without those things.
There are many ways to show your support or appreciation, and they aren’t confined to just a single day a year.  This week, outside of Runza in the Nebraska Union, there will be opportunities to write a note or letter to a U.S. soldier currently serving overseas. There are always options for volunteering at the local Veterans Affairs office, or getting involved in programs like the Veterans Support Foundation.
The Daily Nebraskan would like to say thank you to all of those who have served in combat as well as all of those who have fallen while protecting our freedom.  Our appreciation for the sacrifices made goes beyond print, and we are forever thankful for your services.   Opinion@DailyNebraskan.com   Andrew Dickinson – Editor-in-Chief

I couldn’t put it in better words.  Thank you, to the men and women that are serving overseas and on the front-lines of the United States.  Thank you veterans, for all you have done to make this country what it is today, and for the freedom we have to live in this great United States of America.

Another good place to go/help is Wounded Warrior Project.  I’m sure there are many more, but this had been on my mind.  The greatest casualty is being forgotten.

Why redshirting?

Posted in Sports world with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 13, 2009 by rylanreed

Why is red-shirting some players good for the team and for the player it self and why should you not red-shirt player in different situations.

Compton redshirted as a freshman, but there were several times when he nearly saw the field.

During NU’s game against Virginia Tech, Ekeler came running down the sideline looking for Compton.

“Get ready to rock and roll! You’re going in!” Ekeler told him.

Head coach Bo Pelini also told Compton to get ready, but he soon changed his mind and said it would be a poor decision to burn the redshirt. In hindsight, Compton admits sitting out was the right choice.

“I was nowhere close to where I am now,” Compton said. “It’s an awesome thing to redshirt. You get a year of learning and getting a feel for the game instead of being thrown into the fire.” (Daily Nebraskan)

Here is a little about Josh Williams, Nick Rubek is asking the questions and wrote this article:

Q: What’s the toughest part of redshirting?

A: Just sitting out. I came in and wanted to be in the game. But actually just sitting out and watching guys, that’s probably the toughest part. I think the best part about it was just being able to develop myself to be ready to play college football.

Q: When you look back at it now, do you think a year ago at this time you would have been ready to play?

A: No, I don’t think so. I don’t think I would have been able to do it.  Nick Rubek

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