Archive for NU

Walking on

Posted in Sports world with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 25, 2010 by rylanreed

One of greatest traditions that we have at Nebraska is the walk on program.   Bob Devaney started the walk-on tradition At Nebraska (some would disagree with that point), but Tom Osborne perfected it.

“The walk-on program didn’t really necessarily have a day or year that it started. Remember, it’s only been in the last 60 years or so that they’ve given athletic scholarships, so, in theory, the players on the teams for the first 60 years were all walk-ons. With that said, Langston Coleman is kind of seen as the first successful walk-on player since they started giving out scholarships. Coleman came to NU in the 60s… But, the walk-on program was not all that important until the NCAA started limiting scholarships in the 70s. Once that happened, the program gained prominence and importance, with players like Toby and Jimmy Williams earning honors.”  Nate Rohr

I.M. Hipp is another one of those great walk-ons that went through the historic program.

This is the link for NET…  I was hoping the full length video of what NETV did on the walk-ons would be on this site, but all we get is about 3 minutes.  The site is still good because they have a couple other links, one with Steven M. Sipple and the other is from the Husker’s home page. 

There have been many good walk-ons that have come through the Nebraska system and all of them have gone on to do bigger and better things.  Like the video said, the kick heard around the world was orchestrated by three walk-ons, probably the most well know being Alex Henery.  The story of Derek Meyer’s comeback to Nebraska and now Scott Criss walking on after playing a season in Wyoming is a telling story of what players feel about playing for the Huskers. Continue reading

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The schedule is served

Posted in Sports world with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 16, 2009 by rylanreed

In non-conference play, three out of the four teams are from a lower level division and not really someone that would attract much attention to their play or the game.  I still say both FAU and ASU gave us some problem area’s to work on and challenged us in some others. Why are we playing low level team instead of another BCS great?

Some fans are asking this question, rather wanting the good ole days where high level ranked teams would go head to head to see who was the best.  Trying to play up to someone’s level instead of playing down to another’s.  If anyone looks at our Conference Schedule, you will see it ususally is based with some pretty good teams that could change the final letter either way, and much of Nebraska’s focus needs to be on those teams.  Yes, it would be awesome to see a NU vs. ND,  a NU vs. LSU, or a NU vs. PSU, but with how the money issue and home field advantage has started to decrease the potiental of getting high profile teams to play in our none-conference games, we get the fortune of being able to play those “so-called” “lower-level” football teams.  It definitely helped Nebraska see where they need to improve before actually playing the big boys.

Shatel: November time for big games

It’s big-game week here in God’s country, but elsewhere they are wondering how to liven up September. Esteemed colleague Blair Kerkhoff of the Kansas City Star opines that the Big 12 should consider playing more conference games in September — such as this week’s game matching Texas Tech and Texas — à la the Southeastern and Atlantic Coast. The thinking is that it makes the Big 12 more attractive to TV networks.

I’m all for that — if I don’t have to give up my conference games in November. To see Nebraska play Louisiana-Lafayette between games with Oklahoma and Kansas would be an absolute momentum-killer. Don’t mess with my conference schedule; I want the league dramas to build each week toward a Thanksgiving crescendo. To me, that’s college football. Now, if the Big 12 athletic directors would like to knock off one of the meaningless nonconference games and replace it with a ninth conference game, I’m all for it. But that won’t happen. Too many Big 12 schools need the seven home games. For NU, that’s nearly $5 million a home game.

Why redshirting?

Posted in Sports world with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 13, 2009 by rylanreed

Why is red-shirting some players good for the team and for the player it self and why should you not red-shirt player in different situations.

Compton redshirted as a freshman, but there were several times when he nearly saw the field.

During NU’s game against Virginia Tech, Ekeler came running down the sideline looking for Compton.

“Get ready to rock and roll! You’re going in!” Ekeler told him.

Head coach Bo Pelini also told Compton to get ready, but he soon changed his mind and said it would be a poor decision to burn the redshirt. In hindsight, Compton admits sitting out was the right choice.

“I was nowhere close to where I am now,” Compton said. “It’s an awesome thing to redshirt. You get a year of learning and getting a feel for the game instead of being thrown into the fire.” (Daily Nebraskan)

Here is a little about Josh Williams, Nick Rubek is asking the questions and wrote this article:

Q: What’s the toughest part of redshirting?

A: Just sitting out. I came in and wanted to be in the game. But actually just sitting out and watching guys, that’s probably the toughest part. I think the best part about it was just being able to develop myself to be ready to play college football.

Q: When you look back at it now, do you think a year ago at this time you would have been ready to play?

A: No, I don’t think so. I don’t think I would have been able to do it.  Nick Rubek

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